Rowena Maguire on the responsibilities of emerging economies to reduce emmisions

In today’s QUT Law research seminars, Dr Rowena Maguire examines the shifting global politics around climate change and the emerging power of the BASIC nations. In order to tackle climate change and limit warming to 2 degrees, a global coordinated approach is required. The basic question in international discussions is whether emerging economies should bear Read more about Rowena Maguire on the responsibilities of emerging economies to reduce emmisions[…]

QUT research seminar: Andrew Garwood-Gowers on The Responsibility to Protect and the Arab Spring

The responsibility to protect is a concept that spans international law and international relations. In basic terms, it’s a political concept that has developed over the last decade or so that seeks to respond to mass crimes. Previously, the concept of sovereignty had shielded governments from outside intervention. As a response to genocide in Rwanda Read more about QUT research seminar: Andrew Garwood-Gowers on The Responsibility to Protect and the Arab Spring[…]

Writing ARC grant applications – top tips

Today I attended a session at QUT on grantwriting for ARC competitive grants in the humanities. Here’s the list, and some more detail over the fold:

  1. Do research on what gets funded – what successful projects have been funded before?

  2. Check research priorities; how does your research fit?

  3. Start early.

  4. Clarity and simplicity are the key to success. People have just a few minutes to look through each proposal. Be clear about what you’re doing and why it’s important – make sure it’s right up front.

  5. Follow the guidelines to the letter.

  6. Choose a partner if you do not have a strong track record. Note, however, that if you a person without a strong track record, it will bring down the overall track record. You need to argue the case to support an ECR without a track record in order to justify them. If you have one person with weaknesses, you would need two or three people with outstanding track records.

  7. Review, review, review. Get as many people to provide feedback as possible. Make sure you address all concerns before putting in your final proposal.

  8. Convince the ARC that your proposal is an opportunity to fund something that is urgent. This research needs to be something that is important to fund now, before it’s too late. Don’t insist on this if it’s not urgent, but it does help a proposal.

  9. Write for reviewers. The panel will have diverse disciplinary experiences; it is very important that you assume that the reviewer is an intelligent layperson who doesn’t understand the nature of the field.

  10. Avoid slogans, jargon, polemic. Writing should be straightforward, clear, and very precise.

Ask yourself: would this be something that you would fund?

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