The game of clones and the Australia tax: divergent views about copyright business models and the willingness of Australian consumers to infringe

In a forthcoming issue of the UNSW Law Journal, Paula Dootson and I write about the effect of restrictive copyright licensing practices on the willingness of consumers to infringe copyright. This builds on Paula’s PhD work, and we present qualitative evidence to support the common intuition that the lack of access to legitimate content distribution channels increases the willingness of consumers to infringe copyright. But surpisingly, consumers do want to pay for access at a fair price if they can, and they’ll go to significant lengths to do it (like setting up a VPN to access netflix or itunes from another region).

We’ve made a pre-publication draft of the article available.
[…]

Fairness in copyright – or why rates of infringement are so high

Here’s a paragraph from an article I’m writing about free-riding. It distils my argument about the role of fairness in copyright, and why the industry is only harming itself when it does things like make Game of Thrones only available on Foxtel: In recent decades, the copyright industries have been losing the normative high ground. Read more about Fairness in copyright – or why rates of infringement are so high[…]